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Cal Takes The Field For ALSPrized Pizza The Digital MerckThe Whole Kit And Kaboodle Immortal GenesIndia Joins MacArthur Leaders Extraordinary ExpeditionsTourette Training Grants On September 6, Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr. broke the consecutive-games-played record of 2,130 set by Lou Gehrig, the New York Yankees first-baseman who died in 1941 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- now known as Lou Gehrig's disease. To honor Gehrig, 260 one-time, $5,000 seats were sold along

The Scientist Staff
Sep 17, 1995


On September 6, Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr. broke the consecutive-games-played record of 2,130 set by Lou Gehrig, the New York Yankees first-baseman who died in 1941 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- now known as Lou Gehrig's disease. To honor Gehrig, 260 one-time, $5,000 seats were sold along the first- and third-base sides of the field at Ripken's record-breaking game to raise $1.3 million to establish the Cal Ripken/Lou Gehrig Fund for Neuromuscular Research at Johns Hopkins University. The team kicked in another $700,000 to raise the total to $2 million. The money will support continued basic research on ALS at Hopkins, where the first modestly successful treat-ment for the disease -- a drug called Riluzole -- was recently developed. Riluzole, currently awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval, blocks release of the neurotransmitter glutamate....

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