Notebook

Seven new members joined the National Science Board (NSB) last month, the first appointees to the 24-member body by President Bill Clinton. The NSB oversees the National Science Foundation, headed by Neal Lane, who is also an ex officio member of the board. Members serve six-year terms, and eight members rotate off the board every two years--thus, the incoming group leaves one vacancy overall. Four of the new members are from universities, two from industry, and one from government. Three of th

The Scientist Staff
Jun 25, 1995

Seven new members joined the National Science Board (NSB) last month, the first appointees to the 24-member body by President Bill Clinton. The NSB oversees the National Science Foundation, headed by Neal Lane, who is also an ex officio member of the board. Members serve six-year terms, and eight members rotate off the board every two years--thus, the incoming group leaves one vacancy overall. Four of the new members are from universities, two from industry, and one from government. Three of the seven are women, and one received the Nobel Prize--in economics--in 1987. The seven are Sanford D. Greenberg, chairman and chief executive officer of TEI Industries Inc., Washington, D.C.; Eve L. Menger, director of technical services and administration, Corning Inc., Corning, N.Y.; Claudia I. Mitchell-Kernan, vice chancellor for academic affairs and dean of the graduate division, University of California, Los Angeles; Diana Natalicio, president of the University of Texas,...

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