ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Notebook

Hands Across The Sky Bush Whacking A Hard Task Site Visits Running On Sun Hands Across The Sky Here's a sure sign that the Cold War is over: Astronomers in the United States—a community that in the 1960s was determined to make more scientific discoveries than the Russians—have collected about $45,000 to help preserve astronomy research in the former Soviet Union. "Even when there was a Cold War, we respected the work of our [Russian] colleagues, and the respect has gone both ways,"

The Scientist Staff

Hands Across The Sky
Bush Whacking
A Hard Task
Site Visits
Running On Sun

Hands Across The Sky

Here's a sure sign that the Cold War is over: Astronomers in the United States—a community that in the 1960s was determined to make more scientific discoveries than the Russians—have collected about $45,000 to help preserve astronomy research in the former Soviet Union. "Even when there was a Cold War, we respected the work of our [Russian] colleagues, and the respect has gone both ways," says Stan Woosley, a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and chairman of the American Astronomical Society's Committee to Support Astronomy in the Former Soviet Republics. "We need them to collaborate on costly missions like going to Mars and establishing colonies on the moon—and we need a healthy, viable scientific community there to collaborate with."

Bush Whacking

Among the voices offering...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT