Notebook

If you say something often enough, maybe people will listen. For the fifth time in the past four years, the National Institutes of Health is telling scientists conducting clinical research to include women in their study populations. This latest exhortation comes after Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and other members of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues, following up on a recent General Accounting Office report that pointed out NIH's dismal performance to date in this area, blasted NIH

The Scientist Staff
Oct 14, 1990

If you say something often enough, maybe people will listen. For the fifth time in the past four years, the National Institutes of Health is telling scientists conducting clinical research to include women in their study populations. This latest exhortation comes after Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and other members of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues, following up on a recent General Accounting Office report that pointed out NIH's dismal performance to date in this area, blasted NIH and proposed legislation to address a range of women's health issues. The new NIH policy requires scientists seeking federal funding for clinical research to include women in proportion to the degree they are affected by the disease being studied. It goes into effect on applications submitted after Feb. 1, 1991. Failure to include an adequate number of females will result in a lower priority score from the study section reviewing the application....