Stem Cell Funnies

Tilo Kunath, a research fellow at the University of Edinburgh, found himself chatting with an older gentleman next to him. That had the potential to be sticky: Kunath works with embryonic and extraembryonic stem cell lines, and his work sometimes requires the destruction of human embryos. His traveling companion wasn't exactly quiet about his more socially conservative views.

Brendan Maher
May 1, 2007


<figcaption>Tilo Kunath?s extra embryonic stem cells elicited a few snickers from the audience. Credit: Courtesy of Tilo Kunath</figcaption>
Tilo Kunath's extra embryonic stem cells elicited a few snickers from the audience.
Tilo Kunath

On a flight from Atlanta to Albuquerque in February, Tilo Kunath, a research fellow at the University of Edinburgh, found himself chatting with an older gentleman next to him. That had the potential to be sticky: Kunath works with embryonic and extraembryonic stem cell lines, and his work sometimes requires the destruction of human embryos. His traveling companion wasn?t exactly quiet about his more socially conservative views.

At the risk of being reviled for the rest of the flight, Kunath told him all about his work, which he would be presenting at a Keystone meeting on reproduction in Santa Fe. ?We were from totally different worlds,? says Kunath, 35, and about to begin a role at Edinburgh as a group leader. ?We still got along just fine ?...

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