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The Bigfoot science conference

Bigfoot conference attendees Tom Yamarone (left) and Jeffrey Meldrum show off Sasquatch footprint casts. Credit: © 2006 TOM YAMARONE" />Bigfoot conference attendees Tom Yamarone (left) and Jeffrey Meldrum show off Sasquatch footprint casts. Credit: © 2006 TOM YAMARONE In mid-June the city of Pocatello, Idaho, hosted the Bigfoot Rendezvous, a conference that included a film festival, storytelling, live entertainment, an exhibit at the Idaho Museum of Natural History on how people "know

David Secko
<figcaption>Bigfoot conference attendees Tom Yamarone (left) and Jeffrey Meldrum show off Sasquatch footprint casts. Credit: © 2006 TOM YAMARONE</figcaption>
Bigfoot conference attendees Tom Yamarone (left) and Jeffrey Meldrum show off Sasquatch footprint casts. Credit: © 2006 TOM YAMARONE

In mid-June the city of Pocatello, Idaho, hosted the Bigfoot Rendezvous, a conference that included a film festival, storytelling, live entertainment, an exhibit at the Idaho Museum of Natural History on how people "know" about the Sasquatch, and a symposium described as "featuring regional experts and eye-witnesses as well as nationally known figures in the search for North America?s great ape." About 100 participants attended.

Speakers included wildlife biologist John Mionczynski, who retold stories of investigating Bigfoot encounters; US Forest Service archeologist Kathy Moskowitz-Strain, who spoke on the Hairy Man pictograph; and Uganda National Parks? former park warden, Owen Caddy, who analyzed the famous shaky Patterson-Gimlin film, allegedly of the Sasquatch.

Normally, news of a non-peer reviewed Bigfoot conference wouldn?t grace these pages. But the Bigfoot Rendezvous ran into controversy when...

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