What (some) scientists say

FameLab's approach focuses on entertainment, new faces, and diversity, but another recent science communication effort takes a different approach.

Stephen Pincock
Jun 19, 2005
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FameLab's approach focuses on entertainment, new faces, and diversity, but another recent science communication effort takes a different approach. Jeremy Stangroom, coeditor of The Philosopher's Magazine, has written a new book, What Scientists Think (Routledge Press), in which he interviews twelve well-known investigators about subjects close to their hearts.

The rationale for the book, as he explains in his introduction, is "predicated on the idea that there is something right about this notion that scientists should seek to communicate their views to the wider public." Given Stangroom's day job, it isn't surprising that he takes a rather philosophical approach to his interviews. He focuses on science that relates to the human condition, approaching it as a free-flowing discussion about moral challenges and first principles.

For example, in the opening chapter, Stangroom talks to geneticist Steve Jones from University College London about Darwinism and genes. "Darwin got inheritance fundamentally wrong,"...

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