Autotherapeutics: Mind Over Matter

Ned Shaw If the 20th century will be remembered for outer space exploration and the human genome, the 21st century, I believe, will be known as the "Brain Century." Although voluminous literature has appeared about the brain and its attribute, the infinite mind, our knowledge is still infinitesimal. From the knowledge to date and forthcoming, I foresee that we will, within this century, begin to learn how our frontal cortex, through focused thought, can treat physiological disorders. This woul

Pushkar Kaul
Jul 13, 2003
Ned Shaw

If the 20th century will be remembered for outer space exploration and the human genome, the 21st century, I believe, will be known as the "Brain Century." Although voluminous literature has appeared about the brain and its attribute, the infinite mind, our knowledge is still infinitesimal. From the knowledge to date and forthcoming, I foresee that we will, within this century, begin to learn how our frontal cortex, through focused thought, can treat physiological disorders. This would abolish the use of drugs for treating diseases.

Research has shown that a thought in the cerebral cortex, whether spontaneous or generated in response to an environmental stimulus received through our senses, gets expressed via neurochemical transmission at various junctions connecting our tissues and organs to the central nervous system (CNS). Stress stimuli, for example, received through audio and/or visual inputs, are interpreted by the cerebral cortex, and a response is...

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