Canadian Psychologist Challenges Taboo Against Race Comparisons

For more than 12 months now, I have been embroiled in a fire storm of controversy, with my academic life completely dislocated. The premier of Ontario went on television to state that my views were "morally offensive to the way Ontario thinks" and to say that he had phoned the president of my university to ask for my dismissal. "I would fire him if I could," the premier told TV reporters. Fortunately for me, it was not within the premier's power - but the premier launched a police investigation

Philippe Rushton
May 13, 1990

For more than 12 months now, I have been embroiled in a fire storm of controversy, with my academic life completely dislocated. The premier of Ontario went on television to state that my views were "morally offensive to the way Ontario thinks" and to say that he had phoned the president of my university to ask for my dismissal. "I would fire him if I could," the premier told TV reporters. Fortunately for me, it was not within the premier's power - but the premier launched a police investigation instead.

A combined Ontario Provincial Police and Metropolitan Toronto Police special force concerned with "pornography and hate literature" descended on the university to interview me, along with the university president, my dean, my department chairman, and numerous colleagues at other universities. The investigation covered two possible charges under the Canadian Criminal Code: "willfully promoting hatred" and "spreading false news." After a...

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