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21st-Century R&D In March, the president released a fiscal year 1997 budget that in many ways presages the upcoming elections. At a time when most other domestic discretionary budgets face steep cuts, science and technology funding would increase-for the fourth consecutive year under President Clinton. The reasons why he asked again for increases in basic research, in key technology programs, and in science and technology linked with education, environment, and health speak eloquently about

John Gibbons
May 12, 1996

21st-Century R&D In March, the president released a fiscal year 1997 budget that in many ways presages the upcoming elections. At a time when most other domestic discretionary budgets face steep cuts, science and technology funding would increase-for the fourth consecutive year under President Clinton. The reasons why he asked again for increases in basic research, in key technology programs, and in science and technology linked with education, environment, and health speak eloquently about this administration's commitment to investing for a 21st-century America.

The president believes that research is critical to our future. With this budget, he is saying again that he will not back down in the face of myopic congressional proposals to slash R&D. This administration will continue to advocate science and technology funding as long as Bill Clinton is president.

Over the past year, we have arrived at a bipartisan commitment to balancing the federal budget. Where...

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