Deep And Global Bioethics For A Livable Third Millennium

In three short years it will be Jan. 1, 2001, the first day of the 21st century and a new era. The United States will be expecting the inaugural message of a new president and the world will enter the Third Millennium. As the Second Millennium ends, we ought to think about what kind of a world we should and could realistically hope for. We certainly need a world with fewer than the often-predicted 12 billion people who may be present before the end of the 21st century. Unfortunately, in our mad

Van Rensselaer Potter
Jan 4, 1998

In three short years it will be Jan. 1, 2001, the first day of the 21st century and a new era. The United States will be expecting the inaugural message of a new president and the world will enter the Third Millennium. As the Second Millennium ends, we ought to think about what kind of a world we should and could realistically hope for. We certainly need a world with fewer than the often-predicted 12 billion people who may be present before the end of the 21st century. Unfortunately, in our mad scramble to maintain the capitalistic civilization that attempts to accelerate excess consumption throughout the world, we give little thought to who sits at the table and who goes hungry. On the "Bridge to the 21st Century" we may preempt our chances of arriving at the 25th century or the year 3000. Will we exit from the third millennium...

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