Fonts of Inspiration: From Spider-Man ...

Every scientist or technical innovator has had an illustrious predecessor who has paved the way and provided inspiration for some stroke of brilliance. Paul Dirac had Niels Bohr, Pasteur had Lavoisier, Sol Snyder had Steve Brodie. And David Hunter has Spider-Man. Actually, David Hunter has Jack Love, a circuit court judge in Albuquerque, N.M., who saw a Spider-Man cartoon on television in 1983 that helped paved the way for another technical advance: electronically monitored home incarceration. I

Gregory Byrne
Apr 19, 1987
Every scientist or technical innovator has had an illustrious predecessor who has paved the way and provided inspiration for some stroke of brilliance. Paul Dirac had Niels Bohr, Pasteur had Lavoisier, Sol Snyder had Steve Brodie. And David Hunter has Spider-Man.

Actually, David Hunter has Jack Love, a circuit court judge in Albuquerque, N.M., who saw a Spider-Man cartoon on television in 1983 that helped paved the way for another technical advance: electronically monitored home incarceration. It seems the ol' web swinger used a homing device to track some animated bad guys and the inevitable light bulb lit up in Judge Love's mind. Why not use some sort of electronic shackling device to keep petty criminals under house arrest rather than spend huge sums of public monies to keep them in jails and prisons?

And the rest, as they say, is history. A firm headed by Hunter called BI Inc....

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