'Friend-Raising' For Biomedical Research: What Are You Waiting For?

What Are You Waiting For? (The Scientist, Vol:10, #6, p. 10, March 18, 1996) It is my experience that clinicians and scientists explain their reluctance to become personally involved in advocacy for medical research on the basis of one or more of the following rationalizations: "My efforts won't make any difference." "I don't know how." "I don't have time, and besides, it's not seemly to do so." Rarely do I hear that advocacy isn't necessary, least of all in these times of unprecedented threat

Mary Woolley
Mar 17, 1996

What Are You Waiting For? (The Scientist, Vol:10, #6, p. 10, March 18, 1996)

It is my experience that clinicians and scientists explain their reluctance to become personally involved in advocacy for medical research on the basis of one or more of the following rationalizations: "My efforts won't make any difference." "I don't know how." "I don't have time, and besides, it's not seemly to do so."

Rarely do I hear that advocacy isn't necessary, least of all in these times of unprecedented threats to funding of the National Institutes of Health, but advocacy is usually regarded as somebody s job. If indeed it were ever true that advocacy is the exclusive purview of only a few (deans, presidents, society leaders, voluntary health organizations), that system is not working any more!

cartoon If we don't all become comfortable with the fact that advocacy is part of our jobs now, funding will...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?