Korean Science Opens Its Doors

It has not escaped even the most casual observer that things in South Korea are booming. As H.G. Wells said of Britain in the Industrial Revolution, “Queen Victoria was like a great paperweight that for half a century sat upon men’s minds, and when she was removed their ideas began to blow about all over the place haphazardly.” During the Japanese occupation (1895-1945) and the strict anti-communist regimes since then, ideas in Korea have been strictly controlled and the coun

Alan Mackay
Oct 18, 1987

It has not escaped even the most casual observer that things in South Korea are booming. As H.G. Wells said of Britain in the Industrial Revolution, “Queen Victoria was like a great paperweight that for half a century sat upon men’s minds, and when she was removed their ideas began to blow about all over the place haphazardly.” During the Japanese occupation (1895-1945) and the strict anti-communist regimes since then, ideas in Korea have been strictly controlled and the country still shows traces of the Hermit Kingdom outlook.

As is evident from the recent demonstra- tions, students have been in the forefront of the movement for more democracy and openness. They have a great tradition of leading Korean opinion having, since the Declaration of Independence of March 1, 1919, fought for a new society. “Fought” is a real description and not a metaphor, as the graves of the 208 students...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?