Public, Industry Agree on Biotech

The most important message for biotechnology in the new Office of Technology Assessment's study of public perceptions of the biotechnology industry is that knowledge dispels concern. Based on a nationwide probability sampling conducted last fall by Lou Harris & Associates, the study finds that nearly half of American adults describe themselves as very interested, concerned and/or knowledgeable about science and technology. It also reveals that fully 80 per cent of the American public expects tha

Richard Godown
Jul 12, 1987
The most important message for biotechnology in the new Office of Technology Assessment's study of public perceptions of the biotechnology industry is that knowledge dispels concern. Based on a nationwide probability sampling conducted last fall by Lou Harris & Associates, the study finds that nearly half of American adults describe themselves as very interested, concerned and/or knowledgeable about science and technology. It also reveals that fully 80 per cent of the American public expects that they, or a member of their family, will benefit from developments in this area in the next 20 years. In fact, two-thirds of the U.S. public feels that genetic engineering will make life better for all people.

What is the object lesson here? That our chief critic is a dog who has seen his day? That an enlightened electorate has somehow been won over? That despite constant efforts by some to create fear and spread...

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