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Scientists in the Classroom: An Experiment that Works

A splendid opportunity exists for scientists who want to bring the excitement and joy of science discovery to today's students and, at the same time, profoundly improve the quality of science education. So say the nation's precollege science teachers. As a scientist I've long been aware of the value of scientist-volunteers in the classroom. It seems science teachers concur. In a new survey commissioned by Bayer Corp. and the National Science Teachers Association, U.S. K-12 science teachers sa

Mae Jemison

A splendid opportunity exists for scientists who want to bring the excitement and joy of science discovery to today's students and, at the same time, profoundly improve the quality of science education. So say the nation's precollege science teachers.

As a scientist I've long been aware of the value of scientist-volunteers in the classroom. It seems science teachers concur. In a new survey commissioned by Bayer Corp. and the National Science Teachers Association, U.S. K-12 science teachers say that they are increasingly looking to professional scientists to help strengthen science education.

In a very real sense, science teachers are right there with us on the front line of discovery and innovation. As scientists triumphantly find ways to slow the speed of light, identify planets orbiting distant stars, and produce bioengineered therapies for all manner of diseases, science teachers are preparing today's students for the world where these discoveries will be...

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