Scientists Should Just Say No To High-Cost, Low-Value Journals

If you don't like the pricing of certain journals, the simple answer is don't support, either intellectually or financially, any journal that you think is overpriced. Many such individual decisions would add up to a statement by the community. Purchase is a value judgment. The value in dollars of a journal subscription is determined by what rational purchasers will pay. Thus, if you buy or recommend purchase of a journal, by definition it is not priced beyond its value. We make the decision. I

Spilhaus
Apr 29, 1990

If you don't like the pricing of certain journals, the simple answer is don't support, either intellectually or financially, any journal that you think is overpriced. Many such individual decisions would add up to a statement by the community.

Purchase is a value judgment. The value in dollars of a journal subscription is determined by what rational purchasers will pay. Thus, if you buy or recommend purchase of a journal, by definition it is not priced beyond its value. We make the decision. If we refuse to buy journals that are marginal, either they will change their ways or they will drop out of the race.

There is a need to examine the value of journals in many ways. Henry Barschall and others have recently used citation statistics and price. The American Geophysical Union did such a study in the mid-1970s. We found that the kiloword equivalents per dollar ranged...

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