Sharing Stem Cell Information

Like many fellow California human embryonic stem cell researchers, I am looking forward to taking full advantage of the remarkable opportunity that the state's voters have offered us in the form of $3 billion in funding over the next 10 years.

Jeanne Loring
May 8, 2005
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©David Mack/Photo Researchers, Inc.

Like many fellow California human embryonic stem cell researchers, I am looking forward to taking full advantage of the remarkable opportunity that the state's voters have offered us in the form of $3 billion in funding over the next 10 years. Long before the Stem Cell Research and Cures Act (Proposition 71) was passed, my colleagues and I started developing the infrastructure for human embryonic stem cell (ESC) research that we will build upon to seamlessly transform our underfunded operation to a major state-funded program.

The infrastructure is a group of interrelated projects that I collectively call the "Stem Cell Community," based on the belief that both scientists and the public will benefit from cooperation and communication. Because it is still small, the human ESC research community has an unprecedented opportunity to develop human ESC research as a true worldwide collaborative effort.

The Stem Cell Community...

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