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Weapons Research Extracts A Toll On Academic Science

Do you relish the idea of having an Army or Navy officer looking over your shoulder and deciding whether your research is worthwhile or not? This is not an idle imagining, given the already considerable and ever-expanding influence the military sector is exerting on university campuses. It is a fact that with dollars comes clout, and as the second largest source of federal research support, the military, whose top priority is the development of arms technologies, is increasingly defining the

Carl Leopold

Do you relish the idea of having an Army or Navy officer looking over your shoulder and deciding whether your research is worthwhile or not? This is not an idle imagining, given the already considerable and ever-expanding influence the military sector is exerting on university campuses.

It is a fact that with dollars comes clout, and as the second largest source of federal research support, the military, whose top priority is the development of arms technologies, is increasingly defining the goals and functions of research in the university setting.

Over the past eight years, the demand for new military technologies has resulted in increased pressure on the academic community to focus on the development of new and improved techniques of waging war. According to AAAS Report XIII; in 1988 military contracts to universities constituted more than 18% of the federal research funding to the academic community. In some academic departments,...

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