When Hypotheses Dominate

Scientific experimentation is based on examining falsifiable hypotheses, and not simply using relatively meaningless experiments to prop up thedogma du jour.

George Perry
Dec 5, 2004

Scientific experimentation is based on examining falsifiable hypotheses, and not simply using relatively meaningless experiments to prop up thedogma du jour. But what seems to be the model for domination in science today is the two-party system similar to that seen in many democracies. Be it Labour and the Conservatives in the United Kingdom or Republicans and Democrats in the United States, the two main groupings seek to stifle competition from third parties, such as the Liberal Democrats in Britain or the US Green Party, and in doing so conspire to maintain the status quo. What we have in politics and in science is the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) of "two is company and three is a crowd." Novel findings have to placate one or both camps. The third party is often compared to the spoiler by taking the votes of the anointed two.

The field of Alzheimer disease (AD)...

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