Young Researchers' Disillusionment Bodes Ill For Future Of Science

Over the past year, the scientific community has been debating the existence of a Ph.D. glut. Being a young scientist and a junior faculty member, I read about this with a certain fascination. While I already have my "first real job," I don't yet have the luxury of feeling secure in my career, nor can I ignore the plight of students and postdocs whom I teach and train, and with whom I socialize. >From where I sit, a crisis is brewing in the scientific community, and it is beginning with a cert

James Fleet
May 28, 1995

Over the past year, the scientific community has been debating the existence of a Ph.D. glut. Being a young scientist and a junior faculty member, I read about this with a certain fascination. While I already have my "first real job," I don't yet have the luxury of feeling secure in my career, nor can I ignore the plight of students and postdocs whom I teach and train, and with whom I socialize.

>From where I sit, a crisis is brewing in the scientific community, and it is beginning with a certain darkness of spirit en- compassing young scientists. At the heart of this disaffection is the growing inequity between established and young scientists, as brought out in an emerging trend of underemployment and the reduction in research opportunities for new science graduates with Ph.D.'s. The question that begs to be asked is "How will the scientific community react to...

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