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ACS Survey: Chemistry Salary Increases Sink To Lowest Point In 10-Year Period

Some chemists getting ready to attend the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), to take place in Anaheim, Calif., April 2-6, undoubtedly are preoccupied by personal concerns: According to a recently released ACS survey, salary increases for those working in the field during the 12-month period that ended March 1, 1994, were the lowest in a decade. And those in a position to receive these meager pay raises are the lucky ones--in the year studied, the survey found, chemistry unem

Edward Silverman

Some chemists getting ready to attend the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), to take place in Anaheim, Calif., April 2-6, undoubtedly are preoccupied by personal concerns: According to a recently released ACS survey, salary increases for those working in the field during the 12-month period that ended March 1, 1994, were the lowest in a decade. And those in a position to receive these meager pay raises are the lucky ones--in the year studied, the survey found, chemistry unemployment reached a 22-year high.

The findings underscore that "there's still a lot of trimming going on in the chemical industry, and it's just starting to hit the pharmaceutical industry," says Corinne Marasco, a senior research associate at ACS.

"The basic chemical companies have been hurt by worldwide overcapacity. It's a mature industry, and there's no longer the tremendous growth associated with the postwar period. And so there's less...

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