Federal Aid Boosts Stem Cell Job Market

Scientists with experience cultivating stem cell lines may profit from an expansion of private and public investment sparked by President George W. Bush's decision to provide limited federal funding for human embryonic stem cell (ESC) research. Tommy Thompson, secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) last month suggested that a "ballpark" of $100 million in federal funding for human ESC research would be available for research starting in early 2002. This money will top the $250 million in f

Ted Agres
Oct 14, 2001
Scientists with experience cultivating stem cell lines may profit from an expansion of private and public investment sparked by President George W. Bush's decision to provide limited federal funding for human embryonic stem cell (ESC) research. Tommy Thompson, secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) last month suggested that a "ballpark" of $100 million in federal funding for human ESC research would be available for research starting in early 2002. This money will top the $250 million in federal funds for animal stem cell research and nonembryonic human adult stem cell research. "Now that the president has made the decision that the federal government is going to allow for grants, there's going to be a lot more research in this field with a lot more researchers coming in," Thompson said during an Aug. 10 news conference.1

Some observers caution against too much hype about new jobs and...

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