Finding a Job in Y2K

Julie Vick (left) and Mary Heiberger Now that humankind has survived the Y2K bug threat, it's time for many budding scientists to get back to a more pressing task--finding a job. The prospect can be daunting. But career counselors and experienced job seekers say there are many strategies to make the search easier. Personal contacts, Internet and print ads, job fairs, and search firms (for job seekers with a few years under their belts) are the main places to concentrate your efforts, say the e

Karen Young Kreeger
Jan 23, 2000


Julie Vick (left) and Mary Heiberger
Now that humankind has survived the Y2K bug threat, it's time for many budding scientists to get back to a more pressing task--finding a job. The prospect can be daunting. But career counselors and experienced job seekers say there are many strategies to make the search easier.

Personal contacts, Internet and print ads, job fairs, and search firms (for job seekers with a few years under their belts) are the main places to concentrate your efforts, say the experts. One of the best starting points is close to home--with your mentors and the career center on your campus. Centers have advisers and libraries dedicated to helping. Some, like the University of Pennsylvania's Career Services, E-mail grad students announcements about jobs in academia, industry, and government. This list, organized by Mary Heiberger, associate director of the Penn center, and Julie Vick, graduate career...

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