Fund Aims To See Students Opt For Science Careers

A great perplexity of our time: How do you get more undergraduates to choose careers in science? While some in the science community may wring their hands helplessly in the face of this nettlesome problem, a private foundation in tucson, Ariz., is doing ev- erything it can to resolve it in the near future. Research Corporation, a fund that has been doling out science-support dollars since 1912, has re- cently revamped its grant-making program because it thinks it can help reverse the scie

Wendy Walker
Oct 2, 1988

A great perplexity of our time: How do you get more undergraduates to choose careers in science?

While some in the science community may wring their hands helplessly in the face of this nettlesome problem, a private foundation in tucson, Ariz., is doing ev- erything it can to resolve it in the near future.

Research Corporation, a fund that has been doling out science-support dollars since 1912, has re- cently revamped its grant-making program because it thinks it can help reverse the science student shortage and improve science education.

Student Participation

The vehicle for these hopes is the foundation’s 17-year-old Cottreell Science Grant program, which now gives out about $1 million a year in research money. The grants go only to faculty in undergraduate departments, and the money is contingent upon the teachers’ development of projects that give their students a chance to participate in scientific research and experimentation—as if...

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