Geology Faculty Skeptical About AGI Study

Date: December 7, 1992 Median salaries for most geology faculty rose sharply in the 1991-92 academic year, according to a recently released survey by the Alexandria, Va.-based American geological Institute (AGI). These results are surprising to some geology professors, who contend that salaries have been dampened by the recession. An AGI official acknowledges that the survey may not give a totally accurate picture of faculty pay. A separate AGI study of starting salaries for new graduates sh

Edward Silverman
Dec 6, 1992

Date: December 7, 1992

Median salaries for most geology faculty rose sharply in the 1991-92 academic year, according to a recently released survey by the Alexandria, Va.-based American geological Institute (AGI). These results are surprising to some geology professors, who contend that salaries have been dampened by the recession. An AGI official acknowledges that the survey may not give a totally accurate picture of faculty pay.

A separate AGI study of starting salaries for new graduates shows that environmental concerns have affected overall opportunities in the field.

In AGI's faculty survey, conducted in February and March 1992, administrators reported salaries of their geology faculty. Responses were received from 73 geology departments throughout the United States. The survey found that the median pay for the 513 full professors whose salaries were reported was $61,800, a 9 percent increase from the 1990-91 school year.

Median pay for the 231 associate professors surveyed...

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