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Getting Funded: The Fine Art Of Research Proposal Writing

The Mattia award was established in 1972 by Hoffmann La-Roche Inc. in honor of V.D. Mattia, who served as president and CEO of the company from 1965 to 1971 and was instrumental in setting up the molecular biology institute. Nine of the 25 winners to date have gone on to receive the Nobel Prize, the most recent being 1989 chemistry Nobelist Thomas Cech of the University of Colorado, Boulder, who received the Mattia award in 1987. R

Peter Feibelman
James E. Rothman, chairman of the cellular biochemistry and biophysics program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and vice chairman of the Sloan-Kettering Institute in New York City, has received the 1994 V.D. Mattia Award from the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology of Nutley, N.J. The award, which includes a $10,000 cash prize, was presented to Rothman on October 13 at the Roche institute, where he also delivered a talk on his research entitled "Mechanisms of Intracellular Protein Transport."

The Mattia award was established in 1972 by Hoffmann La-Roche Inc. in honor of V.D. Mattia, who served as president and CEO of the company from 1965 to 1971 and was instrumental in setting up the molecular biology institute. Nine of the 25 winners to date have gone on to receive the Nobel Prize, the most recent being 1989 chemistry Nobelist Thomas Cech of the University of Colorado, Boulder, who received the...

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