Girl Scouting Teaches Youngsters To `Act Like Scientists'

Dale McCreedy enjoyed the job she had from 1978 to 1988 as a research assistant in immunology at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. In her current position, she is working with the Girl Scouts of the United States of America to ensure that a new generation of young women has similar positive scientific experiences. McCreedy is one of several researchers throughout the U.S. who are joining forces with the Girl Scouts to change the way young women view science and, consequently, to increase

Judy Henderson
Jul 11, 1993
Dale McCreedy enjoyed the job she had from 1978 to 1988 as a research assistant in immunology at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. In her current position, she is working with the Girl Scouts of the United States of America to ensure that a new generation of young women has similar positive scientific experiences.

McCreedy is one of several researchers throughout the U.S. who are joining forces with the Girl Scouts to change the way young women view science and, consequently, to increase the number of women who choose it as a career. Women can "contribute a lot," she says. "They can shatter the stereotype of scientists as white, nerdy males."

Girl Scout officials believe that young women still lag behind young men in science and math skills and that their lack of involvement with science not only denies them access to many career options, but also denies the U.S....

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