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Resources   Biotechnology Industry Organization www.bio.com   Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. www.bms.com   Celera Genomics Group www.celera.com   Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology www.cpst.org   Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology career center ns2.faseb.org/careerweb   International Society of Computational Biology www.iscb.org   National Human Genome Research Institute www.nhgri.nih.gov   University of Michig

Karen Young Kreeger

Resources

  Biotechnology Industry Organization
www.bio.com

  Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.
www.bms.com

  Celera Genomics Group
www.celera.com

  Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology
www.cpst.org

  Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology career center
ns2.faseb.org/careerweb

  International Society of Computational Biology
www.iscb.org

  National Human Genome Research Institute
www.nhgri.nih.gov

  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor bioinformatics and proteomics
www.bioinformatics.med.umich.edu
www.proteome.med.umich.edu

  Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
www.bioinformatics.vt.edu

The rush to sequence--and ultimately interpret--the genomes of humans and other species is driving the demand for researchers in certain key areas of the life sciences. With Rockville, Md.-based Celera Genomics Group's announcement early last month that the company had decoded 99 percent of the human genome, the need for genomic experts to mine the "rough draft" for useful sequences, and eventually proteins, seems all but certain.

In the race to finish sequencing the human genome, whether the effort is private...

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