How to Get Inexpensive High-Resolution Printing Without A Laser

A new generation of dot-matrix printers has hit the market, and these devices are ideal for the scientist whose institution can’t af- ford to put a laser printer in every office. The new 24-pin units provide better print quality and more time-saving features than older 24-pin printers, yet they cost much less than laser printers. Now a small laboratory can get high-resolution text and graphics (180 X 360 dote per square inch) for what used to be a low-resolution-only price of aroun

Phillip Good
Jun 26, 1988

A new generation of dot-matrix printers has hit the market, and these devices are ideal for the scientist whose institution can’t af- ford to put a laser printer in every office.

The new 24-pin units provide better print quality and more time-saving features than older 24-pin printers, yet they cost much less than laser printers.

Now a small laboratory can get high-resolution text and graphics (180 X 360 dote per square inch) for what used to be a low-resolution-only price of around $495. The speed of these new printers is the same as their 24-pin predecessor—approximately 180 characters per second in draft mode, 60 cps in letter quality. The quality of the print remains high.

The new printers don’t have a platen (the roller found on type-writers and almost all impact printers), so the operator can say goodbye to paper jams. Now the paper is pulled directly from the tractor...

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