Interviewing for Scientific Jobs

Too often “technical” people fare poorly in a job interview because they have a faulty perception of what is expected of them. They believe that having strong technical credentials is the primary factor utilized in filling a job. In fact, technical credentials represent only one of several criteria an interviewer considers. The very fact that you have been invited for an interview is a good indication that the employer is satisfied you meet the technical requirements for the positi

Susan Arellano
Oct 4, 1987

Too often “technical” people fare poorly in a job interview because they have a faulty perception of what is expected of them. They believe that having strong technical credentials is the primary factor utilized in filling a job. In fact, technical credentials represent only one of several criteria an interviewer considers. The very fact that you have been invited for an interview is a good indication that the employer is satisfied you meet the technical requirements for the position. Interviewers may verify technical qualifications, but more importantly they will assess your personal qualities and strengths to determine how you might “fit in” to their company’s work environment.

To judge your potential with their company, interviewers will be assessing you on several levels, including strengths, personal and professional; attitude; appearance; motivation; skills; work habits; goals; interest in the company; and ability to work with others. You must provide this information in...

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