Minority Research Societies Provide Exposure, Opportunity

'DAUNTING TASK': James Wyche of the Leadership Alliance says that increasing minority representation in the sciences isn't easy. By exposing young minority researchers to established scientific luminaries and opportunities that might be denied them otherwise, minority research societies are helping to even out a playing field that advocates believe still needs leveling. These organizations run the gamut of scientific fields and of minority population groups. Though more poorly funded and

Thomas Durso
Feb 15, 1998
James Wyche
'DAUNTING TASK': James Wyche of the Leadership Alliance says that increasing minority representation in the sciences isn't easy.
By exposing young minority researchers to established scientific luminaries and opportunities that might be denied them otherwise, minority research societies are helping to even out a playing field that advocates believe still needs leveling.

These organizations run the gamut of scientific fields and of minority population groups. Though more poorly funded and obscure than their better- known, general-interest counterparts, minority societies nevertheless play an important role in furthering the academic and industrial careers of their more narrowly drawn membership, according to their leaders.

John F. Alderete, president of the Society for Advancement of Chicano and Native American Scientists (SACNAS) and a professor of microbiology in the Health Science Center at the University of Texas, San Antonio, recalls a SACNAS annual conference of a few years ago. The keynote speaker was Mario Molina,...

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