Multiple Opportunities

Conduct Clinical Trials Clinical trials, an important step in drug development, require a diverse team of people to plan, conduct, monitor, analyze, and write about the detailed, multistep testing of new drugs in humans. For each of these functions, there are promising opportunities for anyone who has a solid life science or health care background, a "detail" orientation, and good interpersonal skills. Available positions on these trials include project managers, medical investigators and study

Lee Katterman
Jun 23, 1996

Conduct Clinical Trials Clinical trials, an important step in drug development, require a diverse team of people to plan, conduct, monitor, analyze, and write about the detailed, multistep testing of new drugs in humans. For each of these functions, there are promising opportunities for anyone who has a solid life science or health care background, a "detail" orientation, and good interpersonal skills. Available positions on these trials include project managers, medical investigators and study coordinators, clinical research associates, data managers and biostatisticians, and medical writers.


THINK FAST: Tim Warneke says clinical trials need people who are quick learners.
Experience with any aspect of the drug-development process makes a candidate for a clinical research position more desirable, according to scientists who do this type of work. In addition, "a key to this industry is to be a quick learner," says Tim Warneke, an associate clinical scientist with Quintiles Transnational Corp.,...

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