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Need For New Drugs Keeps Pharmaceutical Scientists' Pay High

Salaries for most pharmaceutical scientists rose in 1989, reflecting the ongoing development of new drug products and the need to keep pace with inflation, according to the latest annual survey conducted by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. The 5,350-member association, based in Alexandria, Va., represents a wide range of science professionals who design, test, market, and develop drugs. For scientists working in industry--the bulk of those responding--1989 salaries rose

Edward Silverman

Salaries for most pharmaceutical scientists rose in 1989, reflecting the ongoing development of new drug products and the need to keep pace with inflation, according to the latest annual survey conducted by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. The 5,350-member association, based in Alexandria, Va., represents a wide range of science professionals who design, test, market, and develop drugs.

For scientists working in industry--the bulk of those responding--1989 salaries rose 3.4 percent over 1988 pay, to a mean of $63,200. Similarly, pharmaceutical scientists working in academia received pay hikes of 6.5 percent, to a mean of $58,800.

The association sent questionnaires to more than 4,600 of its members between April and July 1990. Of these, 1,854 replied, amounting to a 40 percent response rate. About 63 percent of the respondents held a Ph.D. Seventy-four percent worked in private industry, and 23 percent worked for universities. Most respondents had between 11...

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