New Funding For Cognitive Neuroscience

The James S. McDonnell Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts are providing funds for a new program in cognitive neuroscience research. Researchers in this specialized area focus on the way in which human mental events take place by studying how neural tissue carries out the signals it receives. A total of $12 million has been allocated for the initial three years of the program. A primary goal is to support exceptional postdoctoral work that is underfunded or is unlikely to receive funds fr

Kathryn Fraser Dupont
Jul 8, 1990

The James S. McDonnell Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts are providing funds for a new program in cognitive neuroscience research.

Researchers in this specialized area focus on the way in which human mental events take place by studying how neural tissue carries out the signals it receives. A total of $12 million has been allocated for the initial three years of the program. A primary goal is to support exceptional postdoctoral work that is underfunded or is unlikely to receive funds from other sources. Nonrenewable, two-year research grants of $30,000 per year are available; work that requires interaction of at least two subfields of cognitive neuroscience is preferred.

One-year training grants are available for scientists seeking postdoctoral training in a field different from their previous study. Amounts of grants are based on the host institution's rates. Deadlines are Sept. 1, 1990, for funding on March 1, 1991, and March...

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