New Grants Promote Research, Teaching As Equally Important Duties

A total of 17 young academics in chemistry, physics, and astronomy (see accompanying list) were each granted $50,000, which they are expected to use to fund a research project while also involving their undergraduate students in scientific investigation. The awards program is designed to help third-year faculty at Ph.D.-granting institutions carry out their commitments to both teaching and research and bridge the gap that often exi

Edward Silverman
Jun 26, 1994
Seeking to promote teaching and research as equally important endeavors among university science faculty, the Research Corporation, a Tucson, Ariz.-based nonprofit foundation, recently named the recipients of its first-ever Cottrell Scholars awards.

A total of 17 young academics in chemistry, physics, and astronomy (see accompanying list) were each granted $50,000, which they are expected to use to fund a research project while also involving their undergraduate students in scientific investigation.

The awards program is designed to help third-year faculty at Ph.D.-granting institutions carry out their commitments to both teaching and research and bridge the gap that often exists between the two responsibilities. The grant recipients are not required to prepare budgets and have a great deal of flexibility in how they use their awards.

  • Warren Findlay Beck, assistant professor, chemistry department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

  • David Scott Bohle, assistant professor, chemistry department, University of Wyoming, Laramie

  • Robert M. Bowman, assistant...
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