Obituaries

James Allen Scott, 92, a parasitologist and retired National Institutes of Health official, died August 18 of kidney failure at his home in Bethesda, Md. Scott was an authority on helminthology, the study of diseases caused by parasitic worms. Scott received his Ph.D. in 1927 from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He performed his early research in Egypt between 1929 and 1936, under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation. He was a helminthologist at the Inst

Oct 1, 1990
The Scientist Staff

James Allen Scott, 92, a parasitologist and retired National Institutes of Health official, died August 18 of kidney failure at his home in Bethesda, Md. Scott was an authority on helminthology, the study of diseases caused by parasitic worms.

Scott received his Ph.D. in 1927 from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He performed his early research in Egypt between 1929 and 1936, under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation. He was a helminthologist at the Institute for National Hygiene in Venezuela from 1937 to 1940. After returning from Venezuela, he worked for several universities and the U.S. Census Bureau until 1944, when he joined the University of Texas medical school in Galveston.

Scott joined NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in 1962. He was chief of parasitology and medical entomology from 1968 until 1972, when he retired.

Harold Masursky, 66, a geologist and pioneer space scientist, died August 24 at his home in Flagstaff, Ariz. A former chief of the U.S. Geological Survey's Center for Astrogeology, he had been involved in several landmark space programs, including the Mercury and Apollo programs, the Viking experiments on Mars, the Magellan space project, and the Voyager project.

Masursky retired after a 43-year career with the USGS in February. His earth science research included investigations of eolian deposits, volcanic history, the geology of the Owl Creek Mountains in Wyoming, uranium-bearing coal in Red Desert, Wyo., and structure stratigraphy and volcanic rocks in central Nevada.

Masursky transferred to the astrogeology branch of the USGS in 1962. In 1971 Masursky became chief scientist at the Center of Astrogeology. He was involved in many aspects of the Apollo flights, including the Orbital Science Photography Team and the Apollo field geology team for Apollo 16 and 17. He directed the team that mapped Mars, and in 1976 his team's maps were used to select the Viking landing site. In the 1980s, he had a major role in founding the Magellan space project, which is currently mapping Venus. Masursky had also been involved in naming newly discovered heavenly bodies for the past 20 years.

Masursky received four awards from the USGS. He also received the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum Award for Achievement in Lunar and Planetary Exploration in 1988.

Arthur Rich, 52, a University of Michigan professor of physics, died August 25 of a brain tumor at his Ann Arbor, Mich., home. Rich was best known for his research on positrons and for his design of the positron transmission microscope.

Rich came to Michigan as a graduate student. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1965, he stayed to become an assistant professor of physics. He was promoted to professor in 1975. While on the faculty, Rich held teaching and research positions at the Institute of Fundamental Astrophysics of the University of Paris, the Scuole Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy, the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques in Paris, and the University College in London.