Opportunities Expand for Two-Career Couples

STARTED A TREND: Jane Lubchenco and her husband Bruce Menge became pioneers in the fractional tenure-track concept when they accepted positions at Oregon State University. Maybe you're just entering the work force, after four, six, nine, or even more years of post-high school priming. Or maybe you've been working for a few years and you just got wind of a fantastic opportunity you'd like to pursue. If you're the neophyte, now comes the seemingly monumental task of gathering transcripts and r

James Kling
Jun 7, 1998
STARTED A TREND: Jane Lubchenco and her husband Bruce Menge became pioneers in the fractional tenure-track concept when they accepted positions at Oregon State University.
Maybe you're just entering the work force, after four, six, nine, or even more years of post-high school priming. Or maybe you've been working for a few years and you just got wind of a fantastic opportunity you'd like to pursue. If you're the neophyte, now comes the seemingly monumental task of gathering transcripts and references, sifting through job advertisements in the latest issue of the premier journal of your field, and carefully crafting that cover letter to make it catch a recruiter's eye. If you're the seasoned professional, it's time to update your resume and warn your references.

Never mind preparing for a move to who-knows-where. That's scary enough to unsettle even the most hard-boiled scientist-in-waiting, or the academically acclaimed professor. But hold on,...

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