Organizing One's Own Conference Can Fill A Scientific Void

Sadao Mori's proposal sounded promising to Du Pont chemist Howard Barth. Mori, a researcher at Mie University in Japan, had contacted Barth, an active member of the American Chemical Society, in early 1987, seeking his assistance in setting up a conference on polymer analysis under the auspices of ACS and its Japanese counterpart. While talking over the idea with Mori, however, Barth was struck by a new notion: Why not enlarge the scope of the meeting and bring scientists studying polymer chara

Jeff Seiken
Jun 10, 1990

Sadao Mori's proposal sounded promising to Du Pont chemist Howard Barth. Mori, a researcher at Mie University in Japan, had contacted Barth, an active member of the American Chemical Society, in early 1987, seeking his assistance in setting up a conference on polymer analysis under the auspices of ACS and its Japanese counterpart. While talking over the idea with Mori, however, Barth was struck by a new notion: Why not enlarge the scope of the meeting and bring scientists studying polymer characterization into the fold as well?

Such a gathering would be a novel one, for despite the natural overlap that existed between the fields of polymer analysis and polymer characterization, scientists working in each area rarely intersected on a professional basis. In Barth's view, arranging a joint conference seemed like the perfect way to break down the wall separating the two camps of polymer scientists.

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