Scientist As Teacher

So you love to teach. Now that the school year is in full swing, are you wondering how you can contribute more to the next generation, keep your interest in teaching alive and well, or enhance the pedagogical portion of your resume? "Scientists need to share the wealth of their knowledge and their perspective of the way the world works," says Bassam Shakhashiri, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a member of the editorial advisory board of The Scientist.

Karen Young Kreeger
Sep 17, 2000

So you love to teach. Now that the school year is in full swing, are you wondering how you can contribute more to the next generation, keep your interest in teaching alive and well, or enhance the pedagogical portion of your resume?

"Scientists need to share the wealth of their knowledge and their perspective of the way the world works," says Bassam Shakhashiri, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a member of the editorial advisory board of The Scientist. For 30 years he has been taking his love and enthusiasm for science to the public via lectures and demonstrations; television and radio shows; and now the Web, among other venues. Shakhashiri and others cite a long list of ways that researchers can reach out: giving talks to community groups, working with students and teachers in local schools and museums, interacting with reporters and legislators,...

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