Scientists at the Summit

Courtesy of University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Roy Herbst In those rare moments when Roy Herbst isn't seeing a patient or assessing the results of his research, he's aware of the quickening pace of time. So much of his time has been absorbed with education, training, mulling choices, and making hard decisions, each with potential to twist his life in a new direction. Somewhere in between the classes, the residency, the research, and the promotions, 22 years have slipped by.

Bob Calandra
Dec 1, 2003
Courtesy of University of Texas M.D.
Anderson Cancer Center
 Roy Herbst

In those rare moments when Roy Herbst isn't seeing a patient or assessing the results of his research, he's aware of the quickening pace of time. So much of his time has been absorbed with education, training, mulling choices, and making hard decisions, each with potential to twist his life in a new direction. Somewhere in between the classes, the residency, the research, and the promotions, 22 years have slipped by.

"How do you get where you are when you are constantly being pulled in so many directions?" wonders Herbst, an associate professor of thoracic/head and neck medical oncology at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. "How do you get where you land?"

Herbst has landed at one of the nation's leading cancer centers as its principal investigator for Phase I clinical trials of Endostatin, an anti- angiogenesis drug...