Scientists With M.S. Degrees Find Good Career Prospects In Industry

Prospects In Industry For the scientist who left graduate school holding a master's degree, career prospects in industry look good, according to those involved in corporate hiring. A primary reason for this, they note, is that industry openings at the master's level aren't suffering from a mismatch of supply and demand. Ph.D.'s, on the other hand, are graduating faster than university faculty positions are opening up, and the business world is not picking up the doctoral-level researchers left

Lee Katterman
Apr 1, 1996

Prospects In Industry For the scientist who left graduate school holding a master's degree, career prospects in industry look good, according to those involved in corporate hiring. A primary reason for this, they note, is that industry openings at the master's level aren't suffering from a mismatch of supply and demand. Ph.D.'s, on the other hand, are graduating faster than university faculty positions are opening up, and the business world is not picking up the doctoral-level researchers left behind.

Catherine connor
'LOTS OF JOBS': Placement officer Catherine Connor says that in many cases, opportunities are better for master's scientists than for Ph.D.'s
"At the master's level, there are lots of jobs. The opportunities are better than for Ph.D.'s," says Catherine Connor, director of placement for the Biotechnology Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. "Master's students are being hired. I don't want to say [they are being hired] in preference over...

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