Survey: Female Toxicologists Earn Less

Survey: Female Toxicologists Earn Less Author: EDWARD R. SILVERMAN The average salary for most toxicologists has been rising, prompted by increased hiring, according to a recently released survey. Demand for toxicologists in 1991 was strongest at consulting firms, at contract laboratories (independent labs that conduct research for companies or government), and in industry, particularly at pharmaceutical and consumer products companies, accord- ing to Shayne Gad, who compiled the data for th

Edward Silverman
Mar 7, 1993

Survey: Female Toxicologists Earn Less Author: EDWARD R. SILVERMAN

The average salary for most toxicologists has been rising, prompted by increased hiring, according to a recently released survey.

Demand for toxicologists in 1991 was strongest at consulting firms, at contract laboratories (independent labs that conduct research for companies or government), and in industry, particularly at pharmaceutical and consumer products companies, accord- ing to Shayne Gad, who compiled the data for the Bethesda, Md.-based American College of Toxicology.

The survey's most striking finding, Gad says, was the difference in average pay between men and women--which ranged from 12 percent to 32 percent, depending upon the amount of experience, the degree held, the geographic region, and the type of employer.

Years ExperienceAll RespondentsChange from 1989MenChange from 1989WomenChange from 1989
0 to 1$37,820- 5.9%$41,800-0,6%$31,400+ 1.9%
1 to 3 43,800+15.9% 48,200...

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