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Talking To Reporters: What To Do When `The Call' Comes

So you were passed over for the Nobel Prize (again!) in 1989. Chin up. You probably weren't ready for it, anyway. I don't mean that your research wasn't worthy. And I'm not talking about the public adulation or the prize money. I mean the media attention - the onslaught of TV and radio reporters. You may understand megabytes and particle spin, but what do you know about "sound bites" or putting "spin" on a story? Well, I can help. I'm one of those broadcast news reporters who'll be calling when

Stephen Pendlebury

So you were passed over for the Nobel Prize (again!) in 1989. Chin up. You probably weren't ready for it, anyway. I don't mean that your research wasn't worthy. And I'm not talking about the public adulation or the prize money. I mean the media attention - the onslaught of TV and radio reporters. You may understand megabytes and particle spin, but what do you know about "sound bites" or putting "spin" on a story?

Well, I can help. I'm one of those broadcast news reporters who'll be calling when you do win - or maybe even before.

Some scientists are media-shy - and that's understandable. You've probably seen or heard more than a few stories that were off the mark, or just plain wrong. But you can help prevent that, if you're willing to give us a little of your time. Talking with reporters really isn't painful. In fact,...

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