The 'Where' Factor, Part IV

Jobs in the Southwest: Just a Sampling Editor's Note: Continuing our five-part series on geographic issues that affect job hunting for life scientists, we now turn to the penultimate installment, the Southwest and west to Hawaii. Our boundaries may not be a true geographer's boundaries, but for our purposes, this area includes Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, California, and Hawaii. In the next issue we'll discuss the Northwest, which will include Utah and Alaska. California, in particular the S

Karen Young Kreeger
Jun 25, 2000

Jobs in the Southwest: Just a Sampling

Editor's Note: Continuing our five-part series on geographic issues that affect job hunting for life scientists, we now turn to the penultimate installment, the Southwest and west to Hawaii. Our boundaries may not be a true geographer's boundaries, but for our purposes, this area includes Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, California, and Hawaii. In the next issue we'll discuss the Northwest, which will include Utah and Alaska.

California, in particular the San Francisco Bay area, is the figural epicenter of the life science community in this part of the country. But that's not to say that other regions of the West aren't attractive to bioscience researchers. Spots in Arizona, New Mexico, and Nevada offer many advantages without the high cost of living of California and Hawaii.

San Francisco is the home of biotech, points out David Jensen, managing director of Search Masters International...

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