The 'Where' Factor, Part V

Jobs in the northwest: Just a Sampling Graphic: Cathleen Heard Editor's Note: This is the last installment of our five-part series on geographic issues that affect job hunting for life scientists. We will cover the Northwest and Alaska. Our boundaries may not be a true geographer's boundaries, but for our purposes, this area includes Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. The Northwest is characterized by a few big cities in a sea of sparsely populated countryside, contrasting

Karen Young Kreeger
Jul 9, 2000

Jobs in the northwest: Just a Sampling

Graphic: Cathleen Heard
Editor's Note: This is the last installment of our five-part series on geographic issues that affect job hunting for life scientists. We will cover the Northwest and Alaska. Our boundaries may not be a true geographer's boundaries, but for our purposes, this area includes Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska.

The Northwest is characterized by a few big cities in a sea of sparsely populated countryside, contrasting with the sprawl of the East Coast. As in other regions of the United States, the lay of the land affects opportunities in the life sciences. Despite the relative scarcity of bioscience hot spots compared to California to the south for instance, all of the states covered in this installment boast incredible outdoor recreational spots, notwithstanding the rain of the Pacific Northwest and long, dark winters of Alaska.

Among the major cities...