Welch Foundation Works For Chemistry

One of the major private sources of funding for academic chemists in the United States is a foundation started at the bequest of Robert Alonzo Welch, a man who, ironically, didn't even finish elementary school. Despite his lack of formal education, Welch had an admiration for chemistry because of the discipline's contribution to his success (see story on page 27). Founded in 1954--two years after Welch's death--with $25 million allotted in his will, the Houston-based Welch Foundation now has as

Kathryn Fraser Dupont
Aug 19, 1990

One of the major private sources of funding for academic chemists in the United States is a foundation started at the bequest of Robert Alonzo Welch, a man who, ironically, didn't even finish elementary school. Despite his lack of formal education, Welch had an admiration for chemistry because of the discipline's contribution to his success (see story on page 27). Founded in 1954--two years after Welch's death--with $25 million allotted in his will, the Houston-based Welch Foundation now has assets of more than $280 million.

Norman Hackerman
(Chairman),
Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and President Emeritus,
William Marsh Rice University, Houston

William O. Baker
Chairman of the Board (retired),
AT&T Bell Laboratories,
Murray Hill, N.J.

Elias J. Corey
Professor of Chemistry,
Harvard University,
Cambridge, Mass.

Peter B. Dervan
Professor of Chemistry,
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

Joseph L. Goldstein
Professor and Chairman of Molecular Genetics,
University of Texas Southwestern Medical...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?