Writing for Scientists

The only person who can or should be allowed to create your resumé is you. Only you know ALL the facts, strengths and weaknesses, your likes, dislikes, what you want and where you want to be. Potential employers must, within a few seconds, be able to visualize you as filling a specific position in their company perfectly, and as the solution to the problem which they face. To accomplish this feat, you must provide as much pertinent information as possible—condensed onto approxi

Susan Abellano
Sep 20, 1987

The only person who can or should be allowed to create your resumé is you. Only you know ALL the facts, strengths and weaknesses, your likes, dislikes, what you want and where you want to be.

Potential employers must, within a few seconds, be able to visualize you as filling a specific position in their company perfectly, and as the solution to the problem which they face.

To accomplish this feat, you must provide as much pertinent information as possible—condensed onto approximately one page.

Begin resumé writing by making lists. Exhaustive lists. Don’t worry about length or duplication—at this point, the longer the better. Take a week if necessary to complete your lists, although it usually will require only a few hours.

Make lists for: —Instrumentation you’re familiar with. Give manufacturer, model number, configuration, accessories, associated software, etc. Example: Varian 3700 GC, packed and capillary columns, ECD, PID, FID and...

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