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Acute coronary events more likely at beginning of menstrual cycle

Almost three-quarters of acute cardiac events in premenopausal women occur between days one and five of the menstrual cycle.

(medwire@sciencenow.com)

Researchers in Canada have found that almost three-quarters of acute cardiac events in premenopausal women occur between days one and five of the menstrual cycle. The study, which was reported at the annual meeting of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, raises the possibility that fluctuations in oestrogen levels could be involved in precipitating heart attacks in women at risk of heart disease.

Bettina Hamelin from the Hôpital Lavel, in conjunction with colleagues at the Quebec Heart Institute, studied 28 premenopausal women who had been admitted to hospital with unstable angina or acute myocardial infarction. According to Dr Hamelin, all subjects had at least one risk factor for heart disease: specifically, 43% had hypercholesterolemia, 42% were hypertensive and 36% were current smokers. In addition, 24% were former smokers and 7% were diabetic.

Significantly, 71% of the cohort suffered the acute coronary event within five days after onset of menstruation. Twenty...

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