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Antipsychotic drugs and venous thromboembolism

Case reports and observational studies have suggested that patients who take antipsychotic drugs have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Using a case-control design, Zornberg and Jick (Lancet 2000 356:1219-1223) evaluated patterns of conventional antipsychotic drug use in 42 patients suffering a first idiopathic VTE (cases) and 168 patients matched for factors including age, sex and index date (controls); all patients had filled at least one prescription for an antipsychotic drug

The Scientist Staff

Case reports and observational studies have suggested that patients who take antipsychotic drugs have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Using a case-control design, Zornberg and Jick (Lancet 2000 356:1219-1223) evaluated patterns of conventional antipsychotic drug use in 42 patients suffering a first idiopathic VTE (cases) and 168 patients matched for factors including age, sex and index date (controls); all patients had filled at least one prescription for an antipsychotic drug and were younger than 60 years of age.

Compared with patients who had not filled a prescription within 120 days of the index event, patients who had filled a prescription within 60 days of the index date had a much greater risk of idiopathic VTE (adjusted odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.3 to 21.97). The risk was similar for individual drugs. However, the risk differed according to the class of drug and was particularly high...

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